We have a series of guidance notes which can assist you in understanding what you may be able to do under permitted development.  There are rights specifically for;
Householders;
Agricultural land & building owners;
Operators of commercial premises.

The guidance notes are an introductory guide only and are not a definitive source of legal information.


For further clarification and specific site advice call us today.

We offer advice in relation to the exercise of permitted development rights as set out within the Government’s General Permitted Development Order.  The Development Order is updated annually and it is useful to be aware of the recent changes in order to be certain as to the rights which you can exercise.  Permitted development rights fall into two key categories;

  • Those that can be exercised as of right; and
  • Those that need prior notification to be made to the Local Authority, prior to exercise.


There are rights specifically for;

  • Householders;
  • Agricultural land & building owners;
  • Operators of commercial premises.


For each of these types of planning, clients have their own permitted development rights which allow you to carry out works that you might otherwise be unable to gain a planning consent for. In addition, they allow you to carry out works to your premises without needing to go through the costly planning process and are therefore a very cost effective approach to obtaining planning consent where required and available.

In some areas of the country, known generally as 'designated areas', permitted development rights are more restricted such as if you live in a Conservation Area, a National Park, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty or the Norfolk or Suffolk Broads.  If your site is in a designated area you will need to apply for planning permission for certain types of work which do not need an application in other areas. There are also different requirements if the property is a listed building.

A local planning authority may also have removed some permitted development rights by issuing what is known as an Article 4 Direction or may have removed those rights on the original, or any subsequent, planning permission for the site.  This will mean a planning application will be needed for development which normally does not need one. Before undertaking any development, checks should be made to determine whether any restrictions on permitted development have been made.

Permitted Development Rights

01752 403983

admin@sutherlandpls.com

Sutherland Property & Legal Services